10 Things to Know for Today

By The Associated Press

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. TRUMP SON-IN-LAW DENIES COLLUDING WITH RUSSIA

Jared Kushner denies colluding with Russia and says he has "nothing to hide" in statement ahead of interviews this week with congressional investigators.

2. 'WE'RE LOOKING AT A HUMAN-TRAFFICKING CRIME'

The suspect is due in court after nine people are found dead, and the death toll could rise after dozens were pulled from a sweltering tractor-trailer found parked outside a Walmart in San Antonio.

3. TALIBAN CLAIM SUICIDE BOMBING IN KABUL THAT KILLS 24

The attack took place in a western section of the capital where several prominent politicians reside and at rush hour, ensnaring workers and students, an official says.

4. WHAT NORTH KOREANS ARE FINDING AFTER 6 DECADES

They continue to dig up thousands of U.S. bombs, mortars and pieces of live ammunition leading one bomb-squad member to say the cleanup will take longer than a century to complete.

5. EX-MEMBERS: BRAZILIANS FUNNELED AS 'SLAVES' BY US CHURCH

North Carolina-based Word of Faith Fellowship forced the South Americans to work in jobs like babysitting and construction for little or no pay while subjecting them to physical or verbal assaults, AP finds.

6. HOW HEALTH CARE BILL WILL LOOK A MYSTERY

Sen. John Thune, R-N.D., says lawmakers will move forward with a key vote this week on a GOP health bill, but it's uncertain whether the legislation will seek to replace "Obamacare" or repeal it.

7. HOW EARLY TREATMENT IS VIEWED AS A 'CURE' FOR HIV

A South African girl born with the AIDS virus has kept her infection suppressed for 8 1/2 years after stopping anti-HIV medicines.

8. BLACK WOMEN PICKING UP FIREARMS FOR SELF-DEFENSE

Some say they want to protect their homes, families and themselves, while others cite a worry about today's political climate inspiring violence.

9. POLITICALLY AMBITIOUS PUPS AND KITTIES NEED NOT APPLY

The job of first pet — an enviable White House gig with luxurious live-in privileges and guaranteed positive press coverage — is not currently available.

10. SPIETH MATCHES NICKLAUS WITH 3RD MAJOR BEFORE AGE 24

The Texan's remarkable bogey from the driving range on the 13th hole at the British Open gives him the third leg of the career Grand Slam.

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TOP STORY--Death Toll Reaches 10 in Immigrant-smuggling Case in Texas

By ERIC GAY and WILL WEISSERT, Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — The death toll climbed to 10 in the case of a broiling tractor-trailer found packed with immigrants, federal authorities said Monday as a suspect in the smuggling case awaited a court appearance.

Federal prosecutors said they planned to bring charges against James Mathew Bradley Jr., 60, of Clearwater, Florida. They would not immediately confirm he was the driver of the rig, though local authorities said over the weekend that the driver was arrested.

Authorities discovered eight bodies inside the crowded 18-wheeler parked outside a Walmart in the summer heat, and two more victims died at the hospital.

Officials feared the death toll could rise because nearly 20 others rescued from the truck were in dire condition, many suffering from extreme dehydration and heatstroke.

"We're looking at a human-trafficking crime," San Antonio Police Chief William McManus said Sunday, calling it "a horrific tragedy."

It was not immediately known whether Bradley had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

Authorities would not say whether the trailer was locked when they arrived, but they said it had no working air conditioning.

The victims "were very hot to the touch. So these people were in this trailer without any signs of any type of water," Fire Chief Charles Hood said.

It was the latest smuggling-by-truck operation to end in tragedy. In one of the worst cases on record in the U.S., 19 immigrants locked inside a stifling rig died in Victoria, Texas, in 2003.

Based on initial interviews with survivors of the San Antonio case, more than 100 people may have been packed into the back of the truck at one point in its journey, said Thomas Homan, acting director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Officials said 39 people were inside when rescuers arrived, and the rest were believed to have escaped or hitched rides to their next destination.

At least some of those in the truck were from Mexico and Guatemala, according to diplomats from the two countries. Four of the survivors appeared to be between 10 and 17 years old, Homan said.

Investigators gave no details on where the rig began its journey or where it was headed. But Homan said it was unlikely the truck was used to carry the immigrants across the border into the United States. He said people from Latin America who rely on smuggling networks typically cross the border on foot and are then picked up by a driver.

"Even though they have the driver in custody, I can guarantee you there's going to be many more people we're looking for to prosecute," Homan said.

The truck had an Iowa license plate and was registered to Pyle Transportation Inc. of Schaller, Iowa. A company official did not immediately respond to a phone message seeking comment.

San Antonio is about a 150-mile (240-kilometer) drive from the Mexican border. The temperature in San Antonio reached 101 degrees (38 Celsius) on Saturday and didn't dip below 90 degrees (32 C) until after 10 p.m.

The tragedy came to light after a person from the truck approached a Walmart employee and asked for water late Saturday night or early Sunday morning, said McManus, the police chief. The employee gave the person water and then called police.

On Sunday evening, about 100 people gathered at a San Antonio church for a vigil to mourn the dead.

Immigrants' rights activists and church officials held up handmade signs reading "Who here is not an immigrant" and "No human is illegal."

Those gathered held a moment of silence, then gave speeches blaming federal and Texas authorities' hard-line immigration policies for contributing to the deaths by forcing immigrants to take greater risks to reach the U.S.

"These tragedies are compounded when it's incredibly dangerous and incredibly expensive and we push migration into the hands of illicit actors," immigration activist Bob Libal said in a telephone interview.

In the May 2003 case, the immigrants were being taken from South Texas to Houston. Prosecutors said the driver heard them begging and screaming for their lives but refused to free them. The driver was sentenced to nearly 34 years in prison.

The Border Patrol has reported at least four truck seizures this month in and around Laredo, Texas. On July 7, agents found 72 people crammed into a truck with no means of escape, the agency said. They were from Mexico, Ecuador, Guatemala and El Salvador.

Authorities in Mexico have also made a number of similar discoveries over the years.

Last December, they found 110 migrants trapped and suffocating inside a truck in the state of Veracruz. Last October, also in Veracruz state, four migrants suffocated in a truck carrying 55 people.

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Associated Press writers Mike Graczyk in Houston, Elliot Spagat in San Diego, Peter Orsi in Mexico City and Frank Bajak in San Antonio contributed to this report.

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This story has been corrected to show that people at the vigil in San Antonio held signs saying "No human is illegal," not "No human is legal."

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UPDATE: The Latest: Scaramucci Takes Podium, Declares Loyalty

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on changes to the White House communications staff (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

Newly named White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci went right to work answering journalists' questions after getting the job.

Scaramucci entered the White House press briefing room with Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who now has the position of press secretary for President Donald Trump.

The New York financier repeatedly declared his love for and loyalty to Trump.

Scaramucci also pushed back against the notion that the White House remains adrift six months into Trump's term.

Scaramucci says Trump is doing a phenomenal job and that he'll work with the rest of the White House communications team to get that message "out there a little more aggressively."

He answered a range of questions and blew a kiss and waved to journalists before leaving the briefing room.

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2:45 p.m.

New York financier Anthony Scaramucci has been formally named White House communications director and Sarah Huckabee Sanders has been promoted to press secretary in the Trump White House's latest shakeup.

Trump says in a statement read by Sanders that he's "grateful" for departing press secretary Sean Spicer's "work on behalf of my administration and the American people."

He adds: "just look at his great television ratings!"

Scaramucci also is addressing reporters at the White House. He calls Spicer "a true American patriot" and says he hopes Spicer "goes on to make a tremendous amount of money."

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2 p.m.

Outgoing press Secretary Sean Spicer says that he chose to resign from his position to give incoming communications director Anthony Scaramucci a fresh start.

Spicer says during a brief phone conversation with The Associated Press following his announced departure that, "we're at the point where" the president "could benefit from a clean slate."

He says he felt it would be best for Scaramucci to be able to build his own operation "and chart a new way forward."

Spicer is also complimenting Scaramucci, a New York financier and frequent defender of the president who was a staple at Trump Tower during the president's transition.

Spicer says of Scaramucci's hiring: "It'll be great, he's a tough guy."

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1:50 p.m.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer says it's been "an honor" and "privilege" to serve President Donald Trump and the country.

Spicer resigned Friday in protest over the hiring of a new White House communications director.

He says in a tweet that he will continue his service through August.

One person with knowledge of the situation said Spicer objected to the hiring of New York financier Anthony Scaramucci's lack of qualifications for the communications role. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the personnel matter publicly.

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1 p.m.

White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will be conducting an on-camera briefing on Friday afternoon, following White House press secretary Sean Spicer's resignation.

Spicer announced his departure after President Donald Trump hired a new White House communications director, ending his rocky six-month tenure as Trump's top spokesman.

Sanders has been handling most of the briefing duties in recent weeks, and most briefings have been off-camera. The last on-camera White House briefing was held on June 29.

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12:35 p.m.

White House chief of staff Reince Priebus says he supports incoming communications director Anthony Scaramucci "100 percent."

His comments come moments after White House press secretary Sean Spicer resigned over Scaramucci's hiring.

Priebus and Spicer spent years working closely together at the Republican National Committee. Priebus has also reportedly opposed hiring Scaramucci for various administration positions.

Priebus told The Associated Press that he and Scaramucci are "very good friends." He says it's "all good here" at the White House.

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12:07 p.m.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer is resigning his position, according to two people with knowledge of the decision.

One of those people said Spicer is quitting because of objections over the appointment of a new White House communications director, New York financier Anthony Scaramucci.

The people with knowledge of the decision insisted on anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the personnel matter publicly.